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8 Books To Help You Get Your First Job

Leaving school and joining the workforce can seem overwhelming, but it doesn’t have to be. With the right information, you can make the transition easily and with minimal setbacks (although they are somewhat inevitable).

Chances are, your school taught you some fairly theoretical mathematics, but it likely didn’t teach you how to negotiate your salary or deal with an overbearing boss. This article isn’t a commentary on society, but rather a swift catch up lesson. Here are 8 books that will help you get your first job.

#1 Poke the box by Seth Godin

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A brilliant book and also a short read (which is good because you are about to get really busy in your new job). This book is all about taking initiative, making a difference in your new environment and poking the box: Try things out, see what happens, repeat. You can play it safe, but sometimes that is the riskiest thing you can do. I am convinced this book has helped me show enough initiative to help me stay and develop at the places where I have worked in the past.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Alex Bergstrom from Smartahogtalare

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#2 48 Days to the Work You Love by Dan Miller

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This book goes over everything a person looking for a job would need: from identifying your passion, to building a solid resume and job seeking follow up system, to deciding if entrepreneurship is right for you. I write resumes on the side and always recommend my clients to read this book. It will revolutionize your job seeking experience and help you to land the job of your dreams if you implement the strategies. It event helps entrepreneurs like me to narrow down the work I was made for. Best book ever! 

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Jessica L. Moody from JessicaLMoody

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#3 Caffeinate Your Career by Jennifer Way

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Do you feel like you're snoozing through your career? Are you just about to hit a wall and burnout? Protect your energy and fuel your career with simple, small activities on a consistent basis. This book is about how to infuse the engagements you're working on with a little inspiration. It's about access to resources beyond what your current company provides. Wouldn't it be great if your next job opportunity reached out and tapped you on the shoulder instead of looking for a job? This isn't about more work, it's about better work. Wake up to better work assignments, more money, and greater opportunities in 5 to 15 minutes a day--perfect with your morning coffee. 

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Jennifer Way from Way Solutions

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#4 How to Get a Job Without Going Crazy by Donna Shannon

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This book is wonderful! It's a comprehensive guide to the modern job search that covers everything from writing your resume, using LinkedIn effectively, and even how to target hiring managers. It is written in a way that is easy to understand for even the most novice of job seekers and can be applied to nearly every industry.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Jasmine Giffen from Personal Touch Career Services 

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#5 Strengths Finder 2.0 by Don Clifton

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Graduating from college was probably one of the most exciting and unnerving times of my life. I was happy to be out in the “real world,” but the idea of finding a job seemed impossible (especially for an English major). I knew that if I wanted to find a job, I would need to put in the time and effort. Although, I didn’t want to spend too much time and effort applying for jobs that didn’t suit my career goals. So before beginning my job search, I read a book that I felt would best enable me to apply confidently and find a job that suited my career objectives. 

Knowing your strengths is crucial for getting a job—especially a first job. Companies will expect you to be self-assured in your skills and abilities and at least being aware of them can make all the difference. The online assessment is great for finding out what your strengths are, but the book goes into more detail about how to work with and adapt to certain situations depending on your results. Personally, I found this to be extremely helpful when applying for my first job. Since I knew my strengths, I could easily explain to employers how I could positively contribute to the position or a team. It also made me aware of the jobs I sent my applications to. If a job description wanted skills that were similar to my strengths, I knew that I would feel more poised and confident going into the interview. 

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Carlee Linden from Best Company

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  1. I love this book. I’ve been working with a strengths coach on my strengths, and it’s been super helpful knowing what I’m good at and which areas I can contribute best in.

#6 Drive by Daniel Pink

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Getting a job is not just about making money—it's also about finding a career that you love and that fulfills you. Pink talks about our biological drives and how they play into our work. He suggests that more and more companies are starting to hire with a purpose in mind rather than a profit model of business. I think this is a very valuable book for millennials, Gen X and Gen Y who want a job that fulfills them and gives them a sense of deeper meaning.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Clair Jones from Witty Kitty Digital Marketing

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#7 Dare to Lead by Brene Brown

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Everything Brene Brown touches is golden, and this book is no exception. She talks about the inquisitiveness, vulnerability, and bravery required to lead—both in business and as a responsible member of our society. She took the lessons in this book from the minds of many business leaders who have changed the world, and it's great advice for anyone who wants to be a leader in their chosen field.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Clair Jones from Witty Kitty Digital Marketing

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#8 How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie

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Though seemingly a bit long (roughly 290 pages cover-to-cover), this easily-digested book (written by a pioneer of the self-improvement movement) has sold more than 15 million copies and has helped a vast number of folks in the business world improve their interactions with their bosses, colleagues, subordinates, and customers. (Further, following Carnegie's advice has also likely enriched their personal relationships.)

In this book, Carnegie teaches thirty principles of human relations which provide extremely useful advice about making a good first impression, successfully engaging others in good conversation, gaining co-operation from others, and tactfully handling difficult situations. While a few of Carnegie's principles may not directly apply to the circumstances faced in a job interview, a great many of them fit that situation quite well. When it came to explaining the 'nuts & bolts' of human relations, few authors were ever better than Dale Carnegie!

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Timothy G. Wiedman from Doane University

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