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12 Immersive Post-Apocalyptic Novels For Sci-Fi Lovers

What would the world look like after modern civilization becomes history? The possibilities are endless, but these spectacular post apocalyptic books explore the most mesmeric speculations.

Planet Earth is the only celestial body known to abhor life. It can make you feel special or fill you with dread when you start asking the more dismaying what if questions.

The scientific extrapolations of earth’s future would not make for a storybook Disney ending, but that’s too far off that we’re more likely to have gone through one too many cataclysms before then. What it’d be is up in the air—a nuclear war, a pandemic, AI (artificial intelligence), climate change perhaps.

It is a dreary subject to dwell on. However, we may persevere. We may come out the other end despondent but strong enough to rebuild. Or would we? That question continues to bug minds and inspire some of our most accomplished creatives. The best post-apocalyptic books shared below address this question; and they’d certainly be amongst the most satisfying fictional books you’d have the pleasure of reading this year.

#1 Nocturnal by David Rigtrup

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Contributor: David Rigtrup from DavidriGtrup

  1. If you enjoy a riveting universe and memorable characters, look no further than this awesome story. Sid is a strong female lead in this fictional sci-fi by one of my favorite, young authors.

#2 The Stand by Stephen King

The Stand is one of those books that shocks you with the subtle grotesque realism of Stephen King. The ensemble weaves together to form a character-driven plot about the stand between good and evil. The story covers lots of ground and topics and the epic novel pits main characters against each other for a nail-biting finish. 

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Contributor: Caleb Backe from Maple Holistics

#4 I Am Legend by Richard Matheson

This post-apocalyptic tale follows Robert Nevel a lone survivor in an epidemic of vampirism. Nevel has been losing his mind for a while and is desperately trying to cure the vampirism that seems to have infected the rest of the world. Nevel more than anything has one hope: that he’s not the only one out there.

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Contributor: Caleb Backe from Maple Holistics

#5 The Road by Cormac McCarthy

The Road takes realism to the extreme as only Cormac McCarthy’s minimalist style could. The Road follows a boy and a man in there trek across a desolate country and the cold horrors they face together at the hands of other services. This Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece will surely chill you to the bone.

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Contributor: Caleb Backe from Maple Holistics

#11 The Last Man by Mary Shelley

The author of Frankenstein shocked the British literary world with The Last Man (1826), arguably the first modern post-apocalyptic novel. In it, the world has been devastated by a plague and a group of aristocrats —based in part on Shelley’s late husband Percy Bysshe Shelley and their friend Lord Byron— must unite to survive in the new, ruined world.. The Last Man was harshly criticized when it was published, but Shelley has lately been recognized not only as a post-apocalyptic fiction pioneer but as the mother of science-fiction in general. Now, The Last Man stands as a perfect example that classic lit doesn’t have to be stuffy.

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Contributor: Mayra Paris from Consumers Advocate

#12 The Xenogenesis Trilogy by Octavia E. Butler

Beginning with Dawn (1987), Butler built one of the most lasting stories of human survival in sci-fi history. The protagonist, Lilith, survives nuclear war only to find herself the prisoner of a terrifying alien race called the Oankali, who intend to save humanity by interbreeding. The trilogy ––rounded out by Adulthood Rites (1988) and Imago (1989)–– manages to juggle exciting science-fiction tropes with serious social themes like race, gender, and freedom. It’s the kind of story that can be dissected time and time again, thanks to Butler’s ability to come up with fresh sci-fi ideas. Though she passed away too soon in 2006, Butler’s work still manages to draw in new fans, proving that she truly was ahead of her time.

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Contributor: Mayra Paris from Consumers Advocate

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Written by Taegan Lion