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Best Books: 17 Must-Read Books For Every Law Student

Law is one of the most challenge subjects out there to take. If you want to broaden your perception of law and gain a more in-depth understanding of it then these are the 17 books you should read. Also, these are a great excuse to take a break from reading dry case studies.

#1 The Corporate Counsel Survival Guide by William E. Kruse

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This book offers helpful insight into the unique aspects of serving as in-house counsel and provides a good foundation for anyone who wants to learn more about in-house counsel life.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Ashley Alfirevic from ABA Publishing 

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#2 How to Start and Build a Law Practice by Jay G. Foonberg

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The basic primer on how to start and grow your new law firm. A bit dated but the book covers many important basics that law school never teaches you about starting and running your own firm. 

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Chelsie M. Lamie from Personal Injury Law Office of Chelsie M. Lamie

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#3 Profit First by Mike Michalowicz

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An amazing and very easy way to turn your law firm—even a brand new one — into a money-making machine. This was the best book I’ve read since becoming an attorney. It has fundamentally changed how I handle my money in my business and personal life and is one of the top three reasons my law firm has been profitable since day 90.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Chelsie M. Lamie from Personal Injury Law Office of Chelsie M. Lamie

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#4 The 4-Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss

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A great blueprint for living your best life. How to stop wasting your time on things that don’t make you money, how to live and work where and how you want, and becoming the high value professional that charges a premium in order to minimize the number of sales needed to succeed.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Chelsie M. Lamie from Personal Injury Law Office of Chelsie M. Lamie

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#5 1L by Scott Turow

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Everyone says to read that. I don't remember liking it, although I learned that life or death hangs on making it on law review, and beating all your peers is the primary aim of law school. If you're already in law school, definitely skip it.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: David Engelhardt from Engelhardt Law

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#6 A Civil Action by Jonathan Harr

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Amid the law school grind, it’s easy to lose sight of the fact that being a lawyer is about helping real people. People come to lawyers with problems. It’s our job to help them solve those problems. Always remember, at the end of the day, everything we do impact the lives of real people.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Jory Lange from The Lange Law Firm

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#7 Rules of the Road by Rick Friedman

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As lawyers, we have to take complicated subjects and explain them in ways that non-experts can easily understand. Rick Friedman is one of the masters at distilling a complex fact pattern down to its essential elements. Rules of the Road will show you how to do this, too.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Jory Lange from The Lange Law Firm

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#8 Beyond Bullet Points by Cliff Atkinson

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Facts are important. But facts don’t win cases. Stories win. Stories breathe life into dry facts. Stories grab people’s attention. Most of all, stories drive people to act. Beyond Bullet Points can teach you to weave your facts into a winning story. 

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Jory Lange from The Lange Law Firm

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#9 What’s to Come of the Legal Profession? by Mike Trotter

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The book discusses the future of the legal profession in the United States. As part of his analysis, Trotter reviews the significant changes that have taken place in the practice of law since World War II, describes their effect on the practice of law today, and explains why the challenges now facing the legal profession are no more intimidating than the issues successfully addressed in the past - an opinion not shared by many in the industry. 

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Mike Trotter from Taylor English Duma

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#10 Courtroom 302 by Steve Bogira

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The author spent one year in a criminal courtroom in Chicago watching cases and spending time with the judge assigned to that courtroom. Criminal law in high volume big city courts is an experience that is difficult to explain and capture. But this book does a wonderful job. If criminal law is on your career map, this is a book you should read.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Stuart Shiffman from Book Reporter

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#11 Simple Justice by Richard Kluger

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There are many great legal histories. Simple Justice is the story of Brown v. Board of Education, that case that declared school segregation unconstitutional. Kluger digs deep into the history and personalities that made this case an historical landmark. Chief Justice Earl Warren and eventual Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall are two of the prominent players in the story of this epic constitutional battle. The book is a great primer in constitutional year and Supreme Court advocacy.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Stuart Shiffman from Book Reporter

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#12 Pure Theory of Law by Hans Kelsen

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A great book for all law students, Hans Kelsen approaches and describes the nature of the jurist in a way that will hook the reader. Kelsen explains his theory and how it can be used on a day to day basis. A book that shows the beginning of legal positivism.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Samuel Bellido from PUCP

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#13 50 Lessons for Lawyers by Nora Riva Bergman

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50 Lessons for Lawyers is the first book in a series for the legal community. Nora Riva Bergman is passionate about helping lawyers form better habits and strategies for leadership, work/life balance and productivity -- think Chicken Soup for the Soul, but for lawyers.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Angelle Barbazon from JKS Commucications

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#14 The Last Juror by John Grisham

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Anything by John Grisham is a great read, but I'd have to say my favourite is The Last Juror. The story revolves around a young man who purchases a failing small-town newspaper, that is until a gruesome murder takes place. The young editor follows the story closely, covering all of the horrific details. The murderer is sentenced to life in jail, however, he's released nine years later, and then the real trouble begins. 

A page-turner through and through, you won't be able to set it down until you've finished it. It's a prequel to his first novel A Time To Kill and really helps add backstory to some of the more interesting characters of To Kill - Lucien Wilbanks and Harry Rex Vonner. The author, Grisham, is also an attorney and depicts the processes of the conviction very well which is always refreshing to see in a novel. 

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Angat Saini from Accord Law

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#15 The Introverted Lawyer by Heidi K. Brown

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While naturally loquacious law professors, law students, lawyers, and judges thrive in a world dominated by the Socratic question-and-answer method and rapid-fire oral discourse, quiet thinkers and writers can be sidelined. The Introverted Lawyer illuminates the valuable gifts that introverted, shy, and socially anxious individuals bring to the legal profession—including active listening, deep thinking, empathy, impactful legal writing, creative problem-solving, and thoughtful communication. 

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Heidi K. Brown from Brooklyn Law School 

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#16 Basic Economics by Thomas Sowell

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It seems an odd choice, but economic theory is a primary driver for much current and past legislation, you should have an idea how that field works–so you can know how to argue the purpose of certain legislative acts. 

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: David Engelhardt from Engelhardt Law

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#17 Trying Cases to Win by Herbert J Stern and Stephen A Salt

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This book is an indispensable resource for anyone who wants to learn the art of the trial lawyer. 

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Ashley Alfirevic from ABA Publishing 

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