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6 Philosophy Books Everyone Should Read

Philosophy is one of those subjects that we all wish we understood a little better. It’s a route into understanding ourselves (and others) a little better. Here are 6 philosophy books that everyone should read.

#1 Time for Wonderlust by Forrest J. Wright (Author)

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Although it presents as a retirement book and does include some attention to financial planning toward that goal, his premise is that retirement gives you the time to pursue a passion. His passion happens to be philosophy. He's spent decades reading the great philosophers and making their key concepts accessible to ordinary mortals.

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Contributor: Shel Horowitz from Green And Profitable

#2 Not Trivial by Laurie Endicott Thomas

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Professor Charles Courtney of Drew University says that my book Not Trivial: How Studying the Traditional Liberal Arts Can Set You Free is the best introduction to philosophy that he has ever seen. It explains why the ancient Greeks developed the seven liberal arts, which are disciplines that you need to learn in order to study philosophy. 

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Contributor: Laurie Endicott Thomas from Not Trivial

  1. Your example of how students thought the first lines of the Declaration of Independence were between two lovers convinced me of the importance of grammar.

#3 Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl

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I read Viktor Frankl’s “Man’s Search for Meaning” in college and it was life-changing. I even had my students read it when I later became a teacher. His story of surviving life in a concentration camp and what helped people live and thrive is fascinating. 

At the end of the book, there is one part that really stuck with me. He worked as a psychiatrist and people would ask him, how can you have any sympathy for my problems when you survived life in a concentration camp? His understanding of human suffering is remarkable; he says that human suffering is like gas in a room. 

A small amount of gas will fill a room and a large amount of gas will fill a room. Any kind of suffering, large or small, has a way of filling your life in a very difficult way. We often cannot compartmentalize it. I try to remember that when I see the seemingly small difficulties of others and remember the words of Viktor Frankl. 

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Contributor: Leslie Fischer from Sustainable Slumber

#4 Zen And The Art Of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M Pirsig

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Full of important philosophical questions of the 20th century. It discusses why technology alienated us from the world. You’ll learn that if you can’t define the good, how you can live it.

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Contributor: Caleb Backe from Maple Holistics

#5 Natural Law And Natural Rights by John Finnis

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A revitalized book about the classic traditions of legal positivism. It will teach you about natural law and morality by recovering and developing insights and answering the leading critics.

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Contributor: Caleb Backe from Maple Holistics

#6 On Liberty by John Stuart Mill

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The book discusses the limits on personal freedom. The author was concerned by the possibility of tyranny and believed that the best way to deal with ideas that may be wrong is to discuss them. You’ll see how truth can win by argument and not by force. 

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributor: Caleb Backe from Maple Holistics

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Written by Taegan Lion