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8 Best Books On The Stock Market (For Beginners And Experts)

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There are countless investment books out there, from scammy guru’s books to analytical, Harvard standard analysis on investment. Here are 8 of the best books you should read to learn about the stock market.

#1 Hitting Wall Street’s Fat Pitch Secrets by Charles Mizrahi

I am recommending this book mainly because of the experience and know howMizrahi provides from decades spent in the business. Mizrahi teaches readers how to optimize their investments while minimizing losses and maximizing returns. Showing them strategies he's used countless times with success. How to navigate the market and pick that perfect stock.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Alexandra Countiss from Park Avenue Investment Club

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#2 Understanding Wall Street by Jeffrey Little & Lucian Rhodes

A comprehensive view of the investing universe. Written by the same two guys for the past 30 years. The only book that is required for aspiring professionals (whether i-bankers or traders, buy-side or sell-side); bar none.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Robin Lee Allen from Esperance Private Equity

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#3 Global Asset Allocation by Mebane T. Faber

[This is an] outstanding book to help clarify why various allocations have worked or not worked through the history of the market. It gives a number of asset allocations developed and utilized by several top investors along with the investors' thoughts and justifications for their final percentages. VERY informative!

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Margaret M. Koosa from The Alchemists

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#4 Reminiscences of a Stock Operator by Edwin Lefèvre

This book is not your typical how to type of book. It is much more valuable than that. This is a classic book written almost 100 years ago. Every stock trader or investor should read this book before they even consider placing their first trade. This book sheds light on the ups and downs that a trader will go through during his or her career, and the importance of having the mental fortitude to carry forward even after a losing streak.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Vic Patel from Forex Training Group

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#5 The Investment Answer by Daniel C Goldie & Gordon Murray

This little-known book is a short, but comprehensive spark notes on all the little investment tips that people get at parties and family get-togethers by the friend or family member that thinks he's Ray Dalio. I couldn't think of a better book to read that will provide more value for any investor.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Matthew Murawski from Goodstein Wealth Management, LLC

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#6 Market Wizards by Jack Schwager

The author interviews the leading stock, bond, and currency traders in a such a way that they reveal many of their trading secrets. He reprints the lengthy interviews. This book has taught me more about the stock market than any other book.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Mike Gnitecki from UT Health

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#7 The Stock Market Outsider by Philip Fanara

This book teaches the layman about the stock market, and value investing in today's economy.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Lucas Sawyer from MiniCerts

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#8 42 Rules of Sensible Investing by Leon Shirman

This highly readable guide condenses enough wisdom to save investors years of learning from costly mistakes. Whether you're just starting out or reconsidering your strategy, there are dozens of straightforward rules to help make better, more rational investment decisions. The rules include: Pros and cons of investing in a fund vs on your own; when to sell, and when to do nothing; and why management fees vary and how this affects fund returns.

The book concludes with handy bibliography, internet resources, and a glossary.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Vieta Rosenberg from Profit Factor

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