in

Tips for Optimizing Data Center Power Efficiency

This post contains affiliate links. Affiliate disclosure: As an Amazon Associate, we may earn commissions from qualifying purchases from Amazon.com and other Amazon websites.

The modern data center has become a major hub for key technologies throughout a variety of industries. Compared to a traditional office or business building, data centers accumulate an immense amount of energy consumption. With a slew of information stored within servers and the mere magnitude of power that is needed to amp up the equipment, it’s no wonder that such hubs struggle to sustain streamlined operations.

Since a data center is paramount for contemporary businesses’ ability to thrive, data center professionals and administrators should keep an eye on smaller details to lead to more comprehensive efficacy and better cost savings for all involved. Closely examine the following tips for optimizing data center power efficiency that you can implement in your center ASAP.

Review Internal Practices and Procedures

Power optimization practices do not have to involve expensive changes or spending a lot of money. Rather, consider what changes you can make internally to current procedures. What is hampering efficiency most? Can you alter certain standards to meet needs more appropriately? Can you better distribute human resources to accommodate any shortages?

Data centers struggle with an assortment of shortcomings. Tweaking current practices, equipment, and staffing is simply one of the most rudimentary tips for optimizing data center power efficiency.

Measure Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) Variables

Power usage effectiveness is a critical standard within the industry. PUE is the standard metric used for measuring energy levels—the energy levels of a data center’s infrastructure within normal operating conditions from day-to-day. The formula that calculates this metric is the total energy entering the data center divided by the energy utilized by IT within the center.

This calculation will provide the number of current energy efficiency. This number is not to be used to compare your facility to other centers. Rather, PUE is a facility-benchmark to evaluate site-specific variables that you can alter or improve for greater efficiency.

Upgrade Equipment To Energy-Saving Designs

One important PUE variable is site design and equipment. While investing in up-to-date equipment can be costly, upgrading your center’s servers, machines, and cabling is a worthy investment to reduce power consumption now and in the future.

Data center power distribution depends heavily upon the design, function, and versatility of a space. Also, choose wisely between overhead and underfloor power for boosted flexibility of your power infrastructure. The right power cabling produces a rippling effect. In all likelihood, there are highly-optimized options that can work within your facility’s budget and allow for further growth in the times to come.

Written by Logan Voss

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.