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5 Classics That Are Actually Fun To Read

Love them or hate them, there is no arguing that classics play a huge role in defining the literature of today. However, the mere mention of classics brings back terrifying memories of Shakespeare being read over and over in your English class.

But this doesn’t represent all classics. Here are 5 classics that are actually fun to read.

#1 The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger

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If I was going to pick one classic novel to read, it would not be The Great Gatsby or many of the texts that most schools require. Β I would choose The Catcher in the Rye. Β Holden is such a typical cynical teen and if people would give it a chance they would realize that kids haven't changed. The problem that most people have with this book is that they have a hard time understanding written irony. Β If they can get over the challenge and begin to hear the story then it would be an instant favorite.

Contributors: Jessica L. Moody from JessicaMoody

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#2 Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

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A thoroughly funny, witty, and well-written novel.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: David Barbour from Vivio Life Sciences

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#3 Moby Dick by Herman Melville

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Moby Dick is a classic if you can tackle a 1,000-page book. I read it last year, together with my wife, and found so many situations that are of value even in today's business and management life. The language is phenomenal, and the story keeps you engaged. If the book is too long for you, consider getting on the website of the Nobel Prize Committee in Sweden and hear the audio of the acceptance speech delivered by Bob Dylan. He made an extensive reference to this book, which he named one of the three most important books influencing his work.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Jean-Pierre Jeannet from Babson College

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#4 Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

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I love revisiting the Charles Dickens classics, especially Oliver Twist. Charles Dickens use of language is so fun and so enjoyable even today. 

β€œBut, tears were not the things to find their way to Mr. Bumble's soul; his heart was waterproof.”

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Contributors: Danielle Isbell from Odd Dog Media

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#5 The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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Yes, length and plot development are not exhaustive, and the end is fairly predictable. Readers learn the basics of Jay Gatsby’s life but with very little detail. How he earned his fortune can still be debated, although most would attribute his money to some illegal activity. His early romance with Daisy also leaves many unanswered questions. 

Readers know very little about Nick, the narrator of the story. But perhaps it is the unanswered questions and the brevity of the novel that make it so majestic. It simply does not fit the mold for what most scholars would require of a great novel. It may not be hefty in pages, but it contains some of the most beautiful sentences ever written. Fitzgerald may suggest that the American Dream is a mirage, but his words serve to make it irresistible. The book’s brevity may contribute to its appreciation and greatness in another fashion: readers often return to it to savor its elegant writing once again. 

I read this book in high school and many times since. I have written about the novels and reviewed books about Gatsby. It is one of my all-time favorites.

Want to read more reviews of this book or buy it? Check out the links below:

Contributors: Stuart Shiffman from Bookreporter

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