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Identifying the Characteristics of Operations Where Repetitive Processing is Used

Exploring Process Manufacturing and Repetitive Manufacturing Planning

Key Takeaways:

  • Process manufacturing involves the production of liquids, fibers, powders, and gases through mixing, blending, and filling processes.
  • Repetitive manufacturing is employed for highly repetitive production that relies on a stable and predictable production volume and short lead times.
  • Process manufacturing utilizes ingredients and bills of material, while repetitive manufacturing focuses on product-oriented factory layouts and rapid product flow.
  • Batch processing is common in process manufacturing, characterized by standard production runs and the generation of co-products and by-products.
  • Continuous flow processing is prominent in process manufacturing, with production runs that continue for extended durations and a higher prevalence of co-products and by-products.
  • Material Requirements Planning (MRP) plays a crucial role in batch planning, enabling the processing of work orders with batch quantities and batch bills of material.
  • Repetitive manufacturing planning involves specifying a rate schedule based on daily, weekly, or monthly quantities, with a focus on stable production volumes and short setups.

Introduction

In the realm of manufacturing, different operations and processes are employed based on specific product characteristics and production requirements. Two prominent approaches are process manufacturing and repetitive manufacturing. In this article, we will delve into the characteristics of operations where repetitive processing is used, examining the distinctions between process manufacturing and repetitive manufacturing planning.

Understanding Process Manufacturing Planning

Process manufacturing encompasses the production of products such as liquids, fibers, powders, and gases. Examples include pharmaceuticals, foodstuffs, and beverages. These products are typically manufactured through a two-step process involving mixing or blending and filling or packaging. Intermediate steps like curing, baking, or preparation may also be involved. Process manufacturing relies on ingredients and bills of material, with quantities varying based on grade or potency. Key features of process manufacturing include pacing co-products, planned co-products, and additional processing options in Master Production Scheduling (MPS) and Material Requirements Planning (MRP).

Differentiating Batch and Continuous Processing in Process Manufacturing

Process manufacturing can be categorized into batch processing and continuous flow processing. Batch processing involves producing products in standard runs or lot sizes determined by vessel size, line rates, or standard run length. It is characterized by short production runs and the generation of co-products and by-products. Typical products manufactured through batch processing include pharmaceuticals, foods, inks, paints, glues, and oil or chemical products. On the other hand, continuous flow processing entails production runs that continue for extended durations. Equipment like digital flow meters are dedicated to specific products or product lines, and yield from process operations may vary. Co-products and by-products are more prevalent in continuous processing, which is commonly observed in the production of petroleum-based products and water purification.

The Role of Material Requirements Planning (MRP) in Batch Planning

Batch planning is a vital aspect of process manufacturing. It involves the production of products from a bill of material in a standard run, with the run size determined by vessel capacity or standard run length. Batch planning is commonly used in the production of pharmaceuticals, foods, glues, fermented beverages, and paints. The objective is to process work orders with a batch quantity that aligns with the batch bill of material. Capacity restrictions and component quantity specifications define the size of the batch. Batch planning involves creating a batch bill of material and routing for work order headers, attaching parts lists and routing instructions to the work order header, generating a master schedule of batch work orders, and reviewing the output.

Understanding Repetitive Manufacturing Planning

Repetitive manufacturing is employed in highly repetitive production scenarios where production volumes are stable and predictable, lead times are short, and factory layouts are product-oriented. It often utilizes cellular manufacturing, where dissimilar operations are physically grouped to facilitate rapid product flow. Short setups enable efficient switching between products without significant impacts on production time. Repetitive manufacturing incorporates group technology to accommodate some variety without compromising cost or production speed. Unit of measure is typically each, but it can also be volume- or weight-related in process manufacturing environments. Examples of products suitable for repetitive manufacturing include electronic goods, automobiles, and durable consumer goods such as washing machines and refrigerators.

Conclusion

Repetitive processing finds its application in operations characterized by stable production volumes, short lead times, and rapid product flow. Process manufacturing involves the production of liquids, fibers, powders, and gases through mixing and filling processes. Batch processing is common in process manufacturing, with standard production runs and the generation of co-products and by-products. Continuous flow processing is prominent in process manufacturing, featuring extended production runs and a higher prevalence of co-products and by-products. Material Requirements Planning (MRP) plays a crucial role in batch planning, facilitating the processing of work orders with batch quantities and batch bills of material. Repetitive manufacturing planning focuses on stable production volumes, short setups, and product-oriented factory layouts. By understanding these characteristics, manufacturers can optimize their operations and enhance overall efficiency.

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